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Notices for 30th August 2004 to 20th September 2004


Monday, 30th August 2004

OK, Quick Calendar 2.1.3 is now available, which should really not crash on exit in Mac OS X any more; sorry about the delay in making this available. Thanks again to Ronald Regensburg for testing this for me.

[Edit: From the Quick Calendar page, “I know I said the crash on exit was fixed, but it is not. Turns out, the reason the test copies I gave Ronald were not crashing, is not because I fixed them but because they had longer filenames (like with “test” in them). Don’t ask me, neither of us have a clue. If the filename is 13, 14 or 15 characters long (depending on where you place it on the drive) it will crash on exit after you click the window’s close button. The solutions are to close the program with File > Quit (or cmd-Q I assume), or to rename the program to have a shorter or longer name or put it somewhere else on disc.” Incidentally he has proved that the same problem occurs with Colour Selector in X given the same filename length, so this is probably not a fixable bug. REALbasic 4/5 users should feel free to recompile a working version from source instead.]

While you are here, I have also posted some anecdotes to the Misc section that some of you might enjoy, as long as you are not technophobic anyhow.

And the really astute might notice creeping improvements to the CSS and the way that stylesheets and semantic HTML are being used; my legions of HTML readers will, anyhow.

Saturday, 18th September 2004

Just as a FYI, I changed the filename of the Quick Calendar X application program to a length that should stop it from crashing in Mac OS X for anyone else who downloads it. I do not honestly know how many people were ever affected by this problem, though, probably far fewer than I assumed.

Monday, 20th September 2004

The issue of browser plugin installation resurfaced at the iCab list yesterday, with the problem that people who only possess browsers unsupported by plugin developers (e.g. iCab) cannot install plugins for those browsers without first installing a supported browser that the plugin installer recognises. I thus came up with the idea of the browser plugin installer hack, a 2 kilobyte file that pretends to be Internet Explorer in order to con plugin installers into coughing up their plugin. Weighs in a lot smaller than a Mozilla install and keeps happy those people who refuse to have any Microsoft products on their Macintosh.